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PLANTER BOX GARDENING 101:
CHOOSING THE RIGHT
PLANTER BOX FOR YOU

Planter Box Gardening Made Easy

Having a great container for gardening is important; it creates a hobby that you love, that produces beautifully blooms or healthy harvests. 

For the first two years of vegetable gardening, I strived for long, healthy rows of leafy greens and happy, plant-filled trellises. What I got was a whole lot of... not much.

 

I actually had a lot of confusion about how to grow in my climate and soil. With 40 degree temperature swings each day, fewer than 15 inches of precipitation each year, and sandy soil, I had a lot to overcome. 

That's how I got my start with planter box gardening. 

I learned that I needed to make specific adjustments to my growing conditions so that plants could actually survive. And it all started with providing the right dirt. Having grown up in the Midwest, "raised beds" weren't something I heard about often. People could dig a row in their nutrient-dense soil, direct-sow seeds, and simply watch them grow. Not so in my basalt-laden, sandy soil. 

Raised beds were my first planter box. Now I use a variety of raised beds and containers throughout my yard to fine-tune growing conditions and experience much more success than I ever did working in my native soil. 

Here are some of the varieties of planter boxes that one should consider when growing health and wellness in their backyard.

Types of Containers and their Uses

Raised Beds (ground level)

Cost: Depends on size and material; $$ - $$$

Pros: Tidy appearance, confined space prevents spreading, can be emptied/changed every year; great for root veggies, too

Cons: May require assembly, cost, requires the purchase of soil for filling

Raised Beds (stand up level)

Cost: Depends on size and material; $$ - $$$

Pros: Easy to reach while standing; classy, tidy appearance; storage space below; great for trailing herbs and edible flowers

Cons: May require assembly, cost, requires the purchase of soil for filling

Large Pots

Cost: Depends on size and material; $ - $$$

Pros: Huge variety of materials, colors, shapes, and sizes; easy to move; requires little soil to fill

Cons: May or may not drain well; dries out quicker than a raised bed; prone to damage over the years from the elements

Vertical Gardens

Cost: Depends on size and material; $ - $$$

Pros: Great for patios and small yards; easy to water; space-saving; hydroponic and soil options

Cons: May blow over in high winds; soils may dry quickly.

Unique Gardens

Cost: Depends on size and material; $ - $$$$

Pros: Easy to clean, many creative options for your unique space, low cost options

Cons: Material may impact drainage; read manuals and reviews for more information

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